Talks

THE PLATFORM



The Platform is an experimental forum. Each day will open with a focus on the theme of the collection led by invited collectors followed by a series of conversations following different axes.

PROGRAM

 

THURSDAY 8 NOVEMBER
WOMEN, THE EXCEPTION AN UNDER-REPRESENTATION OF GENDER IN PHOTOGRAPHY?

by Fannie Escoulen

The invention of photography has paved the way for new professional, social and creative conquests. Amateurs and the curious hurried to manipulate the medium, in search of experimentation and discovery. Women, finding it a means of expression and personal emancipation, devoted themselves to this technique with great passion and ambition, which allowed them to access a professional and artistic practice on par with men. Yet, they struggle for recognition in the history of photography, and many still suffer from a lack of visibility. So how do you explain this under-representation of gender? Is photography an art written in the masculine? Invited by the delegation of photography of the Ministry of Culture and Paris Photo, Fannie Escoulen, independent curator, in a day dedicated to female photographers, outlines possible reasons for this proven inequality, inviting historians, critics, sociologists, collectors to provide food for thought, reaffirming the inescapable presence of women in the context of major artistic movements, as in prominent collections.
 

FRIDAY 9 NOVEMBER
DAIDO MORIYAMA / SIMON BAKER

A conversation with the iconic Japanese artist Daido Moriyama and the new Director of the MEP, Simon Baker.

 

ON THE NEW SECTOR CURIOSA: EROTICISM, BODIES AND SEXUAL IDENTITIES

by Martha Kirszenbaum

Conceived as a response and a theoretical complement to Curiosa, the series of talks organized by Martha Kirszenbaum, curator and art critic will question to what extent erotic photography can appear as a point of departure to redefine the representations of our relation to the body and the expression of sexual and social identities. We will firstly attempt to deconstruct the male gaze, often associated with traditional erotic imagery, particularly through rethinking gender hierarchies and feminist practices. Then we will emphasize on the representation of endangered bodies as objects of political  struggle against racial or social discrimination — the black body, the sick body. Finally, we will develop the connection between sexuality and self-representation through post-gender issues and biological control of our own sexuality.
 

SATURDAY 10 NOVEMBER
THE EXHIBITION AS MEDIUM

by David Campany

Photographic artists often look beyond the single image to the body of work – the set, the suite, the series, the album the archive and the typology. In recent years many have extended this idea even further, into the gallery space, turning the exhibition itself into their medium. Various modes of presentation and display combine with three-dimensional scenographic practices to produce photographic environments of different kinds. In this way, the photograph itself is only on part of how they understand their work. At the same time, progressive museums and galleries have developed innovative strategies for presenting photographic material. The exhibition is one of the most experimental areas of photographic culture today. This day of talks and conversations, curated by David Campany, writer and curator, brings together a number of number of artists, curators and scholars who have been at the forefront of this revolution in photographic presentation.
 

SUNDAY 11 NOVEMBER
PHOTOGRAPHY AND SCIENCE / PHOTOGRAPHIC COMMISSIONS

by Christoph Wiesner

The final day of the conversation programme comprises two round table discussions focusing on the relationship between photography and science on one hand and photographic commissions on the other. Photography and science. Jan Dibbets poses the question, “How have photographs influenced perspectives and not objectives". Since its very origin, does the indissociable bond that photography maintains with the scientific approach and uses push us to alter our perception? Since the birth of photography, France has supported policies for large state commission projects. To the present day, photographic missions have primarily focused on conservation, dissemination and research, while the Anglo-Saxon liberal model has opened other avenues through the development of a private market. The arrival of new tools and the development of social networks, have given rise to new commission projects in the field. This round table discussion will seek out new perspectives and attempt to take stock of the current state of play. With the participation of Abivax and Ooshot.